Claim (Our Own) Truth

240_f_86747267_f0t60rxhbgndvifkhbunxs0jictzxkbdHow can you claim, “We are wise; the law of the Lord is with us”? In fact, the lying pen of scribes has produced falsehood. The wise will be put to shame; they will be dismayed and snared. They have rejected the word of the Lordso what wisdom do they really have?…They have treated superficially the brokenness of My dear people, claiming, “Peace, peace,” when there is no peace. (Jeremiah 8:8-9,11)

We sometimes claim what we want to be true. If we claim it enough, it must be true, right?

Not even close.

Each of us has limited perspective. We have a foggy view of reality, moreso in some areas than others. We can share with one another, acknowledging that someone else’s view of a specific truth might be more clear than ours. But only God has crystal clear vision. Only He can truly fact check us. Only He can be completely trusted. We just have to be humble enough to learn – from Him and through others. We can’t get too caught up in our lack of understanding, while being willing to see our misunderstandings. We need to explore what we can and keep moving forward, because fog lifts.

 

Refugees Need Help

b1n4d1yimaa20_tGive us counsel and make a decision. Shelter us at noonday with shade that is as dark as night. Hide the refugees; do not betray the one who flees. Let my refugees stay with you;
be a refuge for Moab from the aggressor. (Isaiah 16:3-4a)

This seems straightforward to me. I know it was written about a specific situation, but I think when we use the cultural context of Scripture to excuse ourselves from helping people, we’re wrong. We don’t honor God or His Word with that kind of dismissive attitude.

I don’t know how to solve the refugee crises around the world right now. But the problem isn’t new. What’s new is being able to argue about it online in real time, to voice each of our opinions with fears, quick answers, and detachment. As if we’re all authorities who completely understand the core issues and can foresee all the implications of what someone else suggests.

What I know is when we dehumanize others, we dehumanize ourselves.

Our lack of compassion and empathy says more about ourselves than any “issue” we might be addressing. And by issue, I mean people’s lives.

Humility.

It has risks, but so does getting out of bed every morning. If we’re not willing to live bold lives, what are our lives actually worth? Who wants to simply pass time, or waste it on social media, every day?

Risks mean we might get hurt. So might others.

Oh, wait. They already are.

People need help.

The Crushing Cost of Quarrels

water explosion

Starting a quarrel is like breaching a dam; so drop the matter before a dispute breaks out. (Proverbs 17:14)

Some battles are worth fighting, but quarrels are wastes of time – time we’ll never recover or relive. I know some people who want to argue just for the sake of being able to prove a point and be declared “right.” But “right” at what cost?

Many of the things we disagree about aren’t paramount. They aren’t life-giving or life-changing. Yet through the disagreements, we damage each other. We try to dismantle the other point of view, but in the process, we dismantle friendships. We erode our own credibility. We elevate ideas or even ourselves in arrogant ways. The points we prove aren’t just about the content of our quarrels. We prove many things about ourselves that we might rather ignore.

Watching someone throw fuel on a fire might give a momentary thrill, but it’s destructive. So, the next time you dig in your heels to prove a point or spew your viewpoint on social media, remember: a breached dam isn’t cleansing; it’s destructive.

Worship Today: Open My Hands

I believe in a blessing I don’t understand
I’ve seen rain fall on wicked and the just
Rain is no measure of his faithfulness
He withholds no good thing from us
No good thing from us, no good thing from us

I believe in a peace that flows deeper than pain
That broken find healing in love
Pain is no measure of his faithfulness
He withholds no good thing from us
No good thing from us, no good thing from us

I will open my hands, will open my heart
I will open my hands, will open my heart
I am nodding my head an emphatic yes
To all that You have for me

Assumed Motives

2015-09-04_16-19-24Why do we assume we know someone’s motives?

We think they’re irritated, disinterested, selfish, inconsiderate, disorganized, or a myriad of other motives. When we don’t like the way someone responds, we can quickly assume we know his or her reason. And rarely is that assumption positive. We can slowly think we know someone in ways that we really don’t.

And that’s dangerous to a relationship, whether it’s at home, work, ministry, or in friendships. We need to be patient enough to clarify through observing patterns over time or simply asking, “Just so I don’t take this the wrong way, can you let me know if you’re (irritated, disinterested, selfish, inconsiderate, etc.)?”

Much of the time, if we’re willing to honestly listen and change our assumptions, we’ll find we’re wrong. And in the process, we’ll let others know we care enough to listen. We’ll try to understand them even when we wouldn’t do things the same way. We’re willing to let someone change what we assume.

And in the process, we’ll deepen our relationships. After all, people are more important than assumptions. People are more important than being right or having things our own way. Listening and being challenged isn’t comfortable, but it’s essential if we want to grow, both personally and relationally.

 

The Christmas Magnifier

8840292-christmas-magnifying-glass-over-background-with-different-association-terms-vector-illustration-stock-vectorChristmas is a magnifier. Whatever is going on in your life is probably amplified right now. That can feel positive, and it can feel negative. Regardless of how it makes you feel, you can choose to respond with honesty, humility, and a willingness to change. Our joy doesn’t come from our circumstances, so what feels like a magical Christmas or depressing Christmas doesn’t define your Christmas, and it doesn’t define you. It’s not time to place blame, dwell on the inescapable, or compare with others.

Our joy and blessings can be permanent. Yes, they seem to shift from time to time, and they certainly change us. The permanence doesn’t mean we feel the same all the time. It doesn’t mean all is happy and wonderful. It means we have a foundation, and when we let the magnifier be about the source of our faith, we amplify the right focus.

What are you magnifying today?

 

The Benefits of Tearing Down

37d512784031dedf5a653be28a66399dFor though we live in the body, we do not wage war in an unspiritual way, since the weapons of our warfare are not worldly, but are powerful through God for the demolition of strongholds. We demolish arguments and every high-minded thing that is raised up against the knowledge of God, taking every thought captive to obey Christ. (1 Corinthians 10:3-6)

Do you consider “tearing down” more positive or negative? Why?

What is your confrontational style? Are you more of an avid confronter or avoiding confronter?

What would it take for you to “take every thought captive to obey Christ”?

Tearing down may seem like a bad thing. To be sure, we’ve all been torn down and apart to varying degrees. We’ve all torn down others, too. But when we’re told in Ecclesiastes that there’s a season for tearing down, that’s not the direction God intends for us. Tearing down refers to demolishing the kind of fighting that is selfish and doesn’t honor God, using weapons He never intended for us to pick up. Tearing down is what we have to do with what doesn’t fit into His ways.

Tearing down isn’t about the other person. It’s about yourself. And it’s not about negative self-talk. It’s about humility, a willingness to see as God sees. He will never demean you. He will challenge you to grow and change but never in an unloving way. It’s not in His character to do so. You can trust Him.

Tearing down includes taking the high road with humility. It’s where we often find common ground with others. When we’re humble, we are willing to look someone in the eye and respect them if for no other reason than they, like us, were created by God. If we choose to tear someone down made in God’s image (no matter what distortion we perceive they are representing), we tear down God, too. Instead, let Him discern what strongholds need to be demolished and what thoughts need to be taken captive. Only He has the insight the ability to do so.

What needs to be torn down in your life so that you can confront someone the way God intends, set aside an argument (not because of avoidance but because God is telling you to humbly set yourself aside), or abundantly forgive someone? Write what you need to tear down on a sticky note. Carry it with you throughout the day. When you’re ready, tear it in half. If you aren’t sure that you can completely demolish the idea of what you need to tear down, keep one half of the paper. When you’re ready, tear it again. Repeat the process until you are ready and willing to completely tear it apart and give it up, letting God have control of you and the situation.