Selfish Change

DXO8ieWWsAAmLrxI would add to the graphic: “Your desire to change must be greater than your desire to have everything your way.”

Sometimes we want change and are willing to uproot the sameness of life but our motives are misguided. We don’t look at the consequences of the uprooting, or perhaps we don’t consider alternate approaches and timing. In the process, we create a mess.

Change is important. Growth is essential.

How we approach both is critical.

We don’t always get a choice, but we have more choices than we want to admit, and with those choices come responsibility. It might make us feel better to say “I didn’t know how to handle it any other way. I did my best.” But is that statement true as we declare it? Were there truly no more options, or were there just not options we liked? How often are we so focused on ourselves that our best efforts are also the most selfish?

Choices are important. They will ripple through others’ lives and reverberate through our own. The more we rationalize the poor choices we make, the louder the cacophony of painful consequences becomes. We might become familiar enough with the noise that our hearing adjusts and we move on, but is that the kind of change we were seeking?

Simply moving on from something isn’t always the best goal. Moving on with character and growth within ourselves and our relationships must be considered.

2 thoughts on “Selfish Change

  1. Your post inspire me to search deep in my heart and soul and help me see that we all need to look toward Jesus for inner growth and peace. Thank you Susan.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s